MedlinePlus Health Topics

Last uploaded: April 29, 2019
Preferred Name

Lupus

Definitions

<h3>What is lupus?</h3> <p>Lupus is an <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/autoimmunediseases.html'>autoimmune disease</a>. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can damage many parts of the body, including the joints, skin, kidneys, heart, lungs, blood vessels, and brain.</p> <p>There are several kinds of lupus</p> <ul> <li>Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common type. It can be mild or severe, and can affect many parts of the body.</li> <li>Discoid lupus causes a red rash that doesn't go away</li> <li>Subacute cutaneous lupus causes sores after being out in the sun</li> <li>Drug-induced lupus is caused by certain medicines. It usually goes away when you stop taking the medicine.</li> <li>Neonatal lupus, which is rare, affects newborns. It is probably caused by certain antibodies from the mother.</li> </ul> <h3>Who gets lupus?</h3> <p>Anyone can get lupus, but women are most at risk. Lupus is two to three times more common in African American women than in Caucasian women. It's also more common in Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. African American and Hispanic women are more likely to have severe forms of lupus.</p> <h3>What causes lupus?</h3> <p>The cause of lupus is not known.</p> <h3>What are the symptoms of lupus?</h3> <p>Lupus can have many symptoms, and they differ from person to person. Some of the more common ones are</p> <ul> <li>Pain or swelling in joints</li> <li>Muscle pain</li> <li>Fever with no known cause</li> <li>Red rashes, most often on the face (also called the "butterfly rash")</li> <li>Chest pain when taking a deep breath</li> <li>Hair loss</li> <li>Pale or purple fingers or toes</li> <li>Sensitivity to the sun</li> <li>Swelling in legs or around eyes</li> <li>Mouth ulcers</li> <li>Swollen glands</li> <li>Feeling very tired</li> </ul> <p>Symptoms may come and go. When you are having symptoms, it is called a flare. Flares can range from mild to severe. New symptoms may appear at any time.</p> <h3>How do I know if I have lupus?</h3> <p>There is no single test to diagnose lupus, and it's often mistaken for other diseases. So it may take months or years for a doctor to diagnose it. Your doctor may use many tools to make a diagnosis:</p> <ul> <li>Medical history</li> <li>Complete exam</li> <li>Blood tests</li> <li>Skin biopsy (looking at skin samples under a microscope)</li> <li>Kidney biopsy (looking at tissue from your kidney under a microscope)</li> </ul> <h3>What are the treatments for lupus?</h3> <p>There is no cure for lupus, but medicines and lifestyle changes can help control it.</p> <p>People with lupus often need to see different doctors. You will have a primary care doctor and a rheumatologist (a doctor who specializes in the diseases of joints and muscles). Which other specialists you see depends on how lupus affects your body. For example, if lupus damages your heart or blood vessels, you would see a cardiologist.</p> <p>Your primary care doctor should coordinate care between your different health care providers and treat other problems as they come up. Your doctor will develop a treatment plan to fit your needs. You and your doctor should review the plan often to be sure it is working. You should report new symptoms to your doctor right away so that your treatment plan can be changed if needed.</p> <p>The goals of the treatment plan are to</p> <ul> <li>Prevent flares</li> <li>Treat flares when they occur</li> <li>Reduce organ damage and other problems</li> </ul> <p>Treatments may include drugs to</p> <ul> <li>Reduce swelling and pain</li> <li>Prevent or reduce flares</li> <li>Help the immune system</li> <li>Reduce or prevent damage to joints</li> <li>Balance the hormones</li> </ul> <p>Besides taking medicines for lupus, you may need to take medicines for problems that are related to lupus such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or infection.</p> <p>Alternative treatments are those that are not part of standard treatment. At this time, no research shows that alternative medicine can treat lupus. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help you cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. You should talk to your doctor before trying any alternative treatments.</p> <h3>How can I cope with lupus?</h3> <p>It is important to take an active role in your treatment. It helps to learn more about lupus - being able to spot the warning signs of a flare can help you prevent the flare or make the symptoms less severe.</p> <p>It is also important to find ways to cope with the stress of having lupus. Exercising and finding ways to relax may make it easier for you to cope. A good support system can also help.</p> <p >NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases</p>

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http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0409974

cui

C0409974

Date created

05/13/1999

definition

What is lupus?

Lupus is an autoimmune disease. This means that your immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues by mistake. This can damage many parts of the body, including the joints, skin, kidneys, heart, lungs, blood vessels, and brain.

There are several kinds of lupus

  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most common type. It can be mild or severe, and can affect many parts of the body.
  • Discoid lupus causes a red rash that doesn't go away
  • Subacute cutaneous lupus causes sores after being out in the sun
  • Drug-induced lupus is caused by certain medicines. It usually goes away when you stop taking the medicine.
  • Neonatal lupus, which is rare, affects newborns. It is probably caused by certain antibodies from the mother.

Who gets lupus?

Anyone can get lupus, but women are most at risk. Lupus is two to three times more common in African American women than in Caucasian women. It's also more common in Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. African American and Hispanic women are more likely to have severe forms of lupus.

What causes lupus?

The cause of lupus is not known.

What are the symptoms of lupus?

Lupus can have many symptoms, and they differ from person to person. Some of the more common ones are

  • Pain or swelling in joints
  • Muscle pain
  • Fever with no known cause
  • Red rashes, most often on the face (also called the "butterfly rash")
  • Chest pain when taking a deep breath
  • Hair loss
  • Pale or purple fingers or toes
  • Sensitivity to the sun
  • Swelling in legs or around eyes
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Swollen glands
  • Feeling very tired

Symptoms may come and go. When you are having symptoms, it is called a flare. Flares can range from mild to severe. New symptoms may appear at any time.

How do I know if I have lupus?

There is no single test to diagnose lupus, and it's often mistaken for other diseases. So it may take months or years for a doctor to diagnose it. Your doctor may use many tools to make a diagnosis:

  • Medical history
  • Complete exam
  • Blood tests
  • Skin biopsy (looking at skin samples under a microscope)
  • Kidney biopsy (looking at tissue from your kidney under a microscope)

What are the treatments for lupus?

There is no cure for lupus, but medicines and lifestyle changes can help control it.

People with lupus often need to see different doctors. You will have a primary care doctor and a rheumatologist (a doctor who specializes in the diseases of joints and muscles). Which other specialists you see depends on how lupus affects your body. For example, if lupus damages your heart or blood vessels, you would see a cardiologist.

Your primary care doctor should coordinate care between your different health care providers and treat other problems as they come up. Your doctor will develop a treatment plan to fit your needs. You and your doctor should review the plan often to be sure it is working. You should report new symptoms to your doctor right away so that your treatment plan can be changed if needed.

The goals of the treatment plan are to

  • Prevent flares
  • Treat flares when they occur
  • Reduce organ damage and other problems

Treatments may include drugs to

  • Reduce swelling and pain
  • Prevent or reduce flares
  • Help the immune system
  • Reduce or prevent damage to joints
  • Balance the hormones

Besides taking medicines for lupus, you may need to take medicines for problems that are related to lupus such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, or infection.

Alternative treatments are those that are not part of standard treatment. At this time, no research shows that alternative medicine can treat lupus. Some alternative or complementary approaches may help you cope or reduce some of the stress associated with living with a chronic illness. You should talk to your doctor before trying any alternative treatments.

How can I cope with lupus?

It is important to take an active role in your treatment. It helps to learn more about lupus - being able to spot the warning signs of a flare can help you prevent the flare or make the symptoms less severe.

It is also important to find ways to cope with the stress of having lupus. Exercising and finding ways to relax may make it easier for you to cope. A good support system can also help.

NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

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Mapped to

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MP HEALTH TOPIC URL

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MP OTHER LANGUAGE URL

Spanish https://medlineplus.gov/spanish/lupus.html

MP PRIMARY INSTITUTE URL

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases http://www.niams.nih.gov/

notation

C0409974

prefLabel

Lupus

Related to

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tui

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