MedlinePlus Health Topics

Last uploaded: August 27, 2019
Preferred Name

Cholesterol

Definitions

<h3>What is cholesterol?</h3> <p>Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that's found in all the cells in your body. Your body needs some cholesterol to make hormones, vitamin D, and substances that help you digest foods. Your body makes all the cholesterol it needs. Cholesterol is also found in foods from animal sources, such as egg yolks, meat, and cheese.</p> <p>If you have too much cholesterol in your blood, it can combine with other substances in the blood to form plaque. Plaque sticks to the walls of your arteries. This buildup of plaque is known as <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/atherosclerosis.html'>atherosclerosis</a>. It can lead to <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/coronaryarterydisease.html'>coronary artery disease</a>, where your coronary arteries become narrow or even blocked.</p> <h3>What are LDL, HDL, and VLDL?</h3> <p>There are different types of cholesterol:</p> <ul> <li><a href='https://medlineplus.gov/hdlthegoodcholesterol.html'>HDL</a> stands for high-density lipoprotein. It is called the "good" cholesterol because it carries cholesterol from other parts of your body back to your liver. Your liver then removes the cholesterol from your body.</li> <li><a href='https://medlineplus.gov/ldlthebadcholesterol.html'>LDL</a> stands for low-density lipoprotein. It is called the "bad" cholesterol because a high LDL level leads to the buildup of plaque in your arteries.</li> <li><a href='https://medlineplus.gov/vldlcholesterol.html'>VLDL</a> stands for very low-density lipoprotein. It is also a "bad" cholesterol because it too contributes to the buildup of plaque in your arteries. But VLDL and LDL are different; VLDL carries <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/triglycerides.html'>triglycerides</a> and LDL carries cholesterol.</li> </ul> <h3>What causes high cholesterol?</h3> <p>The most common cause of high cholesterol is an unhealthy lifestyle. This can include</p> <ul> <li><strong>Unhealthy eating habits,</strong> such as eating lots of bad fats. One type, saturated fat, is found in some meats, dairy products, chocolate, baked goods, and deep-fried and processed foods. Another type, trans fat, is in some fried and processed foods. Eating these fats can raise your LDL (bad) cholesterol.</li> <li><strong>Lack of physical activity,</strong> with lots of sitting and little exercise. This lowers your HDL (good) cholesterol.</li> <li><strong>Smoking,</strong> which lowers HDL cholesterol, especially in women. It also raises your LDL cholesterol.</li> </ul> <p>Genetics may also cause people to have high cholesterol. For example, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited form of high cholesterol. Other medical conditions and certain medicines may also cause high cholesterol.</p> <h3>What can raise my risk of high cholesterol?</h3> <p>A variety of things can raise your risk for high cholesterol:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Age.</strong> Your cholesterol levels tend to rise as you get older. Even though it is less common, younger people, including <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/highcholesterolinchildrenandteens.html'>children and teens</a>, can also have high cholesterol.</li> <li><strong>Heredity.</strong> High blood cholesterol can run in families.</li> <li><strong>Weight.</strong> Being overweight or having obesity raises your cholesterol level.</li> <li><strong>Race.</strong> Certain races may have an increased risk of high cholesterol. For example, African Americans typically have higher HDL and LDL cholesterol levels than whites.</li> <li><strong>Weight.</strong> Being overweight or having obesity raises your cholesterol level.</li> </ul> <h3>What health problems can high cholesterol cause?</h3> <p>If you have large deposits of plaque in your arteries, an area of plaque can rupture (break open). This can cause a <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/bloodclots.html'>blood clot</a> to form on the surface of the plaque. If the clot becomes large enough, it can mostly or completely block blood flow in a coronary artery.</p> <p>If the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your heart muscle is reduced or blocked, it can cause <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/angina.html'>angina</a> (chest pain) or a <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/heartattack.html'>heart attack</a>.</p> <p>Plaque also can build up in other arteries in your body, including the arteries that bring oxygen-rich blood to your brain and limbs. This can lead to problems such as <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/carotidarterydisease.html'>carotid artery disease</a>, <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/stroke.html'>stroke</a>, and <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/peripheralarterialdisease.html'>peripheral arterial disease</a>.</p> <h3>How do I know if I have high cholesterol?</h3> <p>There are usually no signs or symptoms that you have high cholesterol. There is a <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/cholesterollevelswhatyouneedtoknow.html'>blood test</a> to measure your cholesterol level. When and how often you should get this test depends on your age, risk factors, and family history. The general recommendations are:</p> <p><strong>For people who are age 19 or younger:</strong></p> <ul> <li>The first test should be between ages 9 to 11</li> <li>Children should have the test again every 5 years</li> <li>Some children may have this test starting at age 2 if there is a family history of high blood cholesterol, heart attack, or stroke</li> </ul> <p><strong>For people who are age 20 or older:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Younger adults should have the test every 5 years</li> <li>Men ages 45 to 65 and women ages 55 to 65 should have it every 1 to 2 years</li> </ul> <h3>How can I lower my cholesterol?</h3> <p>You can <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/howtolowercholesterol.html'>lower your cholesterol</a> through heart-healthy lifestyle changes. They include a <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/howtolowercholesterolwithdiet.html'>heart-healthy eating plan</a>, <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/weightcontrol.html'>weight management</a>, and <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/howmuchexercisedoineed.html'>regular physical activity</a>.</p> <p>If the lifestyle changes alone do not lower your cholesterol enough, you may also need to take medicines. There are several types of <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/cholesterolmedicines.html'>cholesterol-lowering drugs</a> available, including <a href='https://medlineplus.gov/statins.html'>statins</a>. If you take medicines to lower your cholesterol, you still should continue with the lifestyle changes.</p> <p>Some people with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) may receive a treatment called lipoprotein apheresis. This treatment uses a filtering machine to remove LDL cholesterol from the blood. Then the machine returns the rest of the blood back to the person.</p> <p >NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute</p>

ID

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0008377

cui

C0008377

Date created

10/22/1998

definition

What is cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that's found in all the cells in your body. Your body needs some cholesterol to make hormones, vitamin D, and substances that help you digest foods. Your body makes all the cholesterol it needs. Cholesterol is also found in foods from animal sources, such as egg yolks, meat, and cheese.

If you have too much cholesterol in your blood, it can combine with other substances in the blood to form plaque. Plaque sticks to the walls of your arteries. This buildup of plaque is known as atherosclerosis. It can lead to coronary artery disease, where your coronary arteries become narrow or even blocked.

What are LDL, HDL, and VLDL?

There are different types of cholesterol:

  • HDL stands for high-density lipoprotein. It is called the "good" cholesterol because it carries cholesterol from other parts of your body back to your liver. Your liver then removes the cholesterol from your body.
  • LDL stands for low-density lipoprotein. It is called the "bad" cholesterol because a high LDL level leads to the buildup of plaque in your arteries.
  • VLDL stands for very low-density lipoprotein. It is also a "bad" cholesterol because it too contributes to the buildup of plaque in your arteries. But VLDL and LDL are different; VLDL carries triglycerides and LDL carries cholesterol.

What causes high cholesterol?

The most common cause of high cholesterol is an unhealthy lifestyle. This can include

  • Unhealthy eating habits, such as eating lots of bad fats. One type, saturated fat, is found in some meats, dairy products, chocolate, baked goods, and deep-fried and processed foods. Another type, trans fat, is in some fried and processed foods. Eating these fats can raise your LDL (bad) cholesterol.
  • Lack of physical activity, with lots of sitting and little exercise. This lowers your HDL (good) cholesterol.
  • Smoking, which lowers HDL cholesterol, especially in women. It also raises your LDL cholesterol.

Genetics may also cause people to have high cholesterol. For example, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited form of high cholesterol. Other medical conditions and certain medicines may also cause high cholesterol.

What can raise my risk of high cholesterol?

A variety of things can raise your risk for high cholesterol:

  • Age. Your cholesterol levels tend to rise as you get older. Even though it is less common, younger people, including children and teens, can also have high cholesterol.
  • Heredity. High blood cholesterol can run in families.
  • Weight. Being overweight or having obesity raises your cholesterol level.
  • Race. Certain races may have an increased risk of high cholesterol. For example, African Americans typically have higher HDL and LDL cholesterol levels than whites.
  • Weight. Being overweight or having obesity raises your cholesterol level.

What health problems can high cholesterol cause?

If you have large deposits of plaque in your arteries, an area of plaque can rupture (break open). This can cause a blood clot to form on the surface of the plaque. If the clot becomes large enough, it can mostly or completely block blood flow in a coronary artery.

If the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your heart muscle is reduced or blocked, it can cause angina (chest pain) or a heart attack.

Plaque also can build up in other arteries in your body, including the arteries that bring oxygen-rich blood to your brain and limbs. This can lead to problems such as carotid artery disease, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease.

How do I know if I have high cholesterol?

There are usually no signs or symptoms that you have high cholesterol. There is a blood test to measure your cholesterol level. When and how often you should get this test depends on your age, risk factors, and family history. The general recommendations are:

For people who are age 19 or younger:

  • The first test should be between ages 9 to 11
  • Children should have the test again every 5 years
  • Some children may have this test starting at age 2 if there is a family history of high blood cholesterol, heart attack, or stroke

For people who are age 20 or older:

  • Younger adults should have the test every 5 years
  • Men ages 45 to 65 and women ages 55 to 65 should have it every 1 to 2 years

How can I lower my cholesterol?

You can lower your cholesterol through heart-healthy lifestyle changes. They include a heart-healthy eating plan, weight management, and regular physical activity.

If the lifestyle changes alone do not lower your cholesterol enough, you may also need to take medicines. There are several types of cholesterol-lowering drugs available, including statins. If you take medicines to lower your cholesterol, you still should continue with the lifestyle changes.

Some people with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) may receive a treatment called lipoprotein apheresis. This treatment uses a filtering machine to remove LDL cholesterol from the blood. Then the machine returns the rest of the blood back to the person.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Inverse of RQ

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020443

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020479

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020445

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020473

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020474

Inverse of SIB

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042373

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0014118

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0027051

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0016410

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4529958

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0002871

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0003968

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0004943

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1720755

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0003280

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0700431

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0037473

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0265122

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0006726

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0004153

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0018824

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0018801

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0524620

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042839

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1504421

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1456535

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0007004

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1704436

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735576

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0012173

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042866

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042345

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020649

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4281808

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C3534591

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0018798

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1456555

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0700276

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0012177

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0013604

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023467

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042870

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0010055

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023823

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0002895

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0006644

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0012155

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0003811

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0180306

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0341106

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0012171

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0149871

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042874

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1306759

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0948008

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0007787

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042890

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4529960

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0034734

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0006147

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0751003

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0024236

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0041004

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0206172

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0018823

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0242739

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C2362528

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0162429

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0018790

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0019080

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0018939

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023821

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1458140

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735567

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0005767

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0002874

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0013473

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C2362522

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0518896

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023449

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735577

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0024523

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0039730

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C2963193

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0003486

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0684275

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0024530

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0038454

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0001962

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042878

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042384

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1456637

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0026691

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0599638

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0017086

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0302148

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0028754

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0679360

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0005818

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735575

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0162800

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0007203

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0008031

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0003364

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023826

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0598901

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0920298

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C2963178

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0026267

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0003402

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023473

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0018821

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0042849

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0553692

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C3495801

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0036974

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0016470

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735573

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0002962

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023434

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0007273

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0162577

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0878544

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0302583

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C2362324

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1332977

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0242295

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0026162

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020538

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0005910

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0009555

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0011878

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1956346

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1456671

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0039483

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735574

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0003857

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0018799

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023418

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0004238

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0002940

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020542

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0311164

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0016475

Inverse of SY

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020443

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020476

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020473

Mapped from

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0008377

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735577

Mapped to

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0020443

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0008377

MP HEALTH TOPIC URL

https://medlineplus.gov/cholesterol.html

MP OTHER LANGUAGE URL

Japanese https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Japanese

Hindi https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Hindi

Vietnamese https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Vietnamese

Spanish https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Spanish

Russian https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Russian

Tagalog https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Tagalog

Portuguese https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Portuguese

Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)

Ukrainian https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Ukrainian

Spanish https://medlineplus.gov/spanish/cholesterol.html

Bosnian https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Bosnian

Arabic https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Arabic

Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect)

Korean https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Korean

French https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#French

Somali https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cholesterol.html#Somali

MP PRIMARY INSTITUTE URL

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/

notation

C0008377

prefLabel

Cholesterol

Related to

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0524620

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735576

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C1456555

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023823

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0012171

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0041004

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023821

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735567

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0360714

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0518896

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735577

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0023826

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735573

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C4735574

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C0018799

Scope Statement

Your body needs some cholesterol, but too much can raise your risk of heart disease. Know the types (HDL and LDL), and how to lower high cholesterol.

tui

T109

T123

subClassOf

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C2362499

http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDLINEPLUS/C2362501

Delete Subject Author Type Created
No notes to display
Create New Mapping

Delete Mapping To Ontology Source
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/LNC/LP15493-7 LOINC CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/LNC/LP15493-7 LOINC LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MESH/D002784 MESH CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MESH/D002784 MESH LOOM
http://doe-generated-ontology.com/OntoAD#C0008377 ONTOAD LOOM
http://purl.jp/bio/10/gmo/GMO_001821 GMO LOOM
http://phenomebrowser.net/ontologies/mesh/mesh.owl#D04.808.247.222.284 RH-MESH LOOM
http://sbmi.uth.tmc.edu/ontology/ochv#2883 OCHV LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/dinto_DB04540 DINTO LOOM
http://phenomebrowser.net/ontologies/mesh/mesh.owl#D04.808.247.808.197 RH-MESH LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/DRON_00723185 DRON LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/DRON_00723185 DRON LOOM
http://www.co-ode.org/ontologies/galen#Cholesterol GALEN LOOM
http://scai.fraunhofer.de/MSOntology#Cholesterol MSO LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/NDDF/002556 NDDF CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/NDDF/002556 NDDF LOOM
http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh85024654 FAST-TOPICAL LOOM
http://www.semanticweb.org/ADMO#cholesterol ADMO LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/LNC/LP100019-1 LOINC CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/LNC/LP100019-1 LOINC LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/RXNORM/2438 RXNORM CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/RXNORM/2438 RXNORM LOOM
http://www.semanticweb.org/席婷/ontologies/2019/3/untitled-ontology-62#Cholesterol PCALION LOOM
http://stirdf.jst.go.jp/id/200907040526382996 IOBC LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/SCTSPA/84698008 SCTSPA CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/NDFRT/N0000146961 NDFRT CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/NDFRT/N0000146961 NDFRT LOOM
http://www.pepathway.org/peo/1.2#cholesterol PE-O LOOM
http://scai.fraunhofer.de/CSEO#CSEO_00000455 CSEO LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/VANDF/4018648 VANDF CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/VANDF/4018648 VANDF LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/UPa_UPC00187 UPA LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/LNC/MTHU003147 LOINC CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/LNC/MTHU003147 LOINC LOOM
http://ontology.apa.org/apaonto/termsonlyOUT%20(5).owl#Cholesterol APAONTO LOOM
http://localhost/plosthes.2017-1#8788 PLOSTHES LOOM
http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C369 NCIT LOOM
http://ncicb.nci.nih.gov/xml/owl/EVS/Thesaurus.owl#C369 NCIT LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MEDDRA/10008650 MEDDRA LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 HUPSON LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 TXPO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 BIOMODELS LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 GO-PLUS LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 IDOBRU LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 CHEBI LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 TXPO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 OCMR LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 CCONT LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 EFO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 TXPO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 TXPO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 EFO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 GO-PLUS LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 CHEBI LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 UPHENO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 TXPO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 ZP LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 HINO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 TXPO LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 OBA LOOM
http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/CHEBI_16113 ONSTR LOOM
http://sbmi.uth.tmc.edu/ontology/ochv#C0008377 OCHV LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/SNOMEDCT/84698008 SNOMEDCT CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/SNOMEDCT/84698008 SNOMEDCT LOOM
http://www.projecthalo.com/aura#Cholesterol AURA LOOM
http://scai.fraunhofer.de/AlzheimerOntology#cholesterol ADO LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/CSP/0658-4141 CRISP CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/CSP/0658-4141 CRISP LOOM
http://purl.jp/bio/4/id/200906081386040806 IOBC LOOM
http://www.semanticweb.org/ontologies/2018/1/ProstateCancer.owl#Cholesterol PCAO LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/NDFRT/N0000007064 NDFRT CUI
http://phenomebrowser.net/ontologies/mesh/mesh.owl#D002784 RH-MESH LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/RCD/X80Iz RCD CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/RCD/X80Iz RCD LOOM
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/MSHFRE/D002784 MSHFRE CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/SNMI/F-63980 SNMI CUI
http://purl.bioontology.org/ontology/SNMI/F-63980 SNMI LOOM
http://phenomebrowser.net/ontologies/mesh/mesh.owl#D10.570.938.208 RH-MESH LOOM
http://phenomebrowser.net/ontologies/mesh/mesh.owl#D10.851.208 RH-MESH LOOM